Quinoa Salad 2

Quinoa Salad

Quinoa Salad

1 cup Quinoa
2 cups water
1 zucchini
1/2 to 1 cup soy beans
1/2 to 1 cup whole cherry tomatoes
1/4 to 1/2 of 1 orange pepper
1/4 cup fresh flat leaf parsley
2 Tablespoons of Balsamic Vinegar
3 Tablespoons of Roasted Garlic (or regular) Olive Oil
1/2 tsp each, dried Basil, Oregano and Thyme
Salt and Pepper to taste
Avocado and/or Parmesan or Feta cheese (optional)
1. Thoroughly rinse Quinoa under cool water to remove any powdery residue to remove the bitter resin-like coating (called saponin).
2.  In a saucepan, bring 2 cups of water and Quinoa to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 8 minutes. Add soy beans, return cover and cook for another 6 minutes or so, or until all the water is absorbed.
3. Remove from heat, uncover and allow to cool while you’re preparing the rest of the ingredients.
4. Grill Zucchini and allow to cool a few minutes before you cut, set aside.
5. Quarter the cherry tomatoes dice the pepper and chop up the fresh parsley.
6. To put salad together, fold in vegetables and mix in the oil, vinegar, dried herbs and salt & pepper.
Top with sliced avocado or shredded Parmesan or Feta if desired.

See video on making Quinoa Salad on Fox19’s morning show

 

 


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2 thoughts on “Quinoa Salad

  • Evelyn Valdes

    I am a cuban-american and I made alinado for my son when I was pregnant and stored some for the future. The problem is that he now turns 15 next month and I have two bottles which have been stored and they look very thick in consistency practically undrinkable. My mother, which originally made the alinado has passed away and I really dont know what to do at this point as we are one month away from his birthday. Please let me know if you have any suggestions.

    Thanks.

    • bettyhakes Post author

      Evelyn,

      Unfortunately, I do not have experience with the drink as I learned about the recipe and tradition from my brother-in-law’s mother who is from Oriente. My understanding from the tradition is that you’d be able to drink this 15 or 20 years after it’s made. Although, my recommendation is to “go with your gut.” If it doesn’t smell good and you don’t feel like it’s safe, don’t drink it. Toast his 15th year with a Rum and Coke or Mojito.

      Good luck and let me know what you decide to do.
      Betty